Statement Socks // How We Wear Them

-1-6-2-4-3 -5

With a couple of polar vortexes and a handful of arctic blasts under our belts for the year, we think we speak for everyone when we say that spring can’t come too soon. Fortunately warmer days are ahead and, with this, we can shed our drab winter wardrobes for a more vibrant palette. For the spring, one of the best ways to incorporate a not-so-subtle punch of color to any wardrobe is within the region between the shoe and the hem. We’re talking about socks here; however, not just wearing them, but making a statement. This presents a sense of ease and a way to add a little personality into any outfit.

We’re all too familiar with the precedent rule of sock wearing – matching the color of your socks to the color of your pants. Black pants, black socks; navy pants, navy socks; and so on. Despite its rigidness, this is a rule that we recommend following when dressing for professional, formal or black-tie occasions. Although within this rule lies a grey area, and this is where the fun begins.

If you’re wearing a pair of dress navy slacks to the office, for example, coordinate with a pair of navy socks that incorporate contrast ribbing or subtle stripes – such as our Blue and Red Radcliff, Navy Keswick or Navy and Red Elden dress socks. The additional color and texture helps to add a level of depth beyond the standard monotone color palette. Or take this a step further (pun intended) with the Blue Radcliff Dress Sock [photograph to the left]. Although blue is the sock’s primary color, the secondary navy color is used to smoothly ease the sock into the outfit.

You can never go wrong with a neutral colored sock when wearing khaki or earth tone pants. What is great about neutral socks is that they’re completely versatile and can be worn with pretty much everything, whether if the pairing pant is neutral or not. Just make sure that the hue of the pant is darker than the sock. We recommend our Grey Radcliff Dress Sock and our Grey and Beige Layton Argyle Sock.

For those of you willing to take chances and break the rules — because after all, this is what it’s all about — go with a contrast sock. Don’t be afraid of color, and a great place to start is by visiting one of those color wheels from our elementary school art class days. Orange is across from blue on the color wheel, which is why the Orange Merrill Stripe Sock compliments so effortlessly with a pair of dark denim or navy chinos. When setting out to wear a contrast color, you are generally safe with complementary colors (colors that are opposite of each other on the color wheel), triad colors (colors that are evenly spaced out on the color wheel in thirds), and square colors (colors spaced evenly out on the color wheel in fourths). Perhaps there is a secondary color in your blazer, shirt or necktie. Wearing a pair of socks in that color is a great opportunity to fully bring an outfit together. Disclaimer: When wearing additional colors, just be mindful not to over do it. If you have a lot of color and pattern going on up top, it would be wise to wear a neutral colored sock as an anchor. When dressing, it’s all about striking the right balance.

When putting an outfit together, the details matter and socks are no exception to this. Socks should be granted with the same enthusiasm as your outfit’s other complimenting accessories – necktie, pocket square, etc. We’re rarely granted the opportunity to be daring in our clothing choices, but socks are the one place where we have the freedom to have a little fun. We encourage you to further refine and develop your personal style; so in the process, why not show your ankles some love too?

Shop our spring collection of socks and accessories here.


For more style advice, feel free to contact our Style Counselor, Juliana, at juliana@ledbury.com, or our Customer Service team at customer-service@ledbury.com at any time.

 

3 comments

  • I love your socks, but I only wear over the calf socks. If you ever decide to sell that style I will certainly purchase them. Thanks and keep up the good work.

  • Anyone know who makes those suede bucks?

Leave a Reply to Scott Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

comments